Emergency Management

Overview

We have all watched the news and seen the horrible devastation a disaster brings to a community. What is less known, is an emergency plan can minimize the loss of life, provide rapid emergency care to the injured and displaced, create a safe environment for victims,  protect property, and bring organization and order to a potentially chaotic situation.  It is the local government’s ultimate responsibility to protect its citizens as much as possible during any crisis.  To achieve this goal, the Village Emergency Management Committee completed a comprehensive revision of our Emergency Plan (2011) and restructured our Emergency Management Program to assure ongoing preparedness by local officials, Village staff and emergency service providers.  With this plan, coupled with county, state, and federal resources, Brooklyn is now positioned to respond quickly and effectively to any disaster we might face.  This link provides a short version of our Emergency Plan.   In addition, this site will periodically provide general information on emergency preparedness topics to to inform what families and individuals can to more effectively manage their own possible emergencies. Leif Spilde, Assistant Director of Public Works and Assistant Fire Chief, has been appointed Emergency Management Director and responsible for additions to this link.

 

 

 

Dane County National Hazard Mitigation Plan Updates

Hazard Plan Listening Session_Flyer

Emergency Management Plan

Click on above wording to take you to the plan.

Emergency Contact Numbers

Badger Chapter of Red Cross 1-877-618-6628

Salvation Army 608-256-2321

Poison Center 1-800-222-1222

ChemTrec 1-800-424-9300

Dane County Emergency Management 608-266-4330

Green County Emergency Management 608-328-9416

Tornado Safety at Home, Work, or at Play

  • In a home or building, move to a pre-designated shelter, such as a basement, and get under a sturdy table or the stairs. A specially-constructed "safe room" within a building offers the best protection. Use an internet search engine and search for "safe room" for more information.
  • If a basement is not available, move to a small interior room or hallway on the lowest floor and cover yourself with anything close at hand: towels, blankets, pillows. If possible, get under a sturdy table, desk or counter. Put as many walls as possible between you and the storm. Stay away from windows.
  • If caught outdoors, seek shelter in a sturdy building. If you cannot quickly walk to shelter, get into a vehicle, buckle your seatbelt and drive to the closest sturdy shelter. If flying debris occurs while you are driving, pull over and park. Now you have two options as a last resort: - Stay in the vehicle with the seatbelt on and place your head below the windows. - If you can safely get noticeably lower than the roadway, exit the vehicle and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands. Do not seek shelter under an overpass.
  • Mobile homes, even if tied down, offer little protection from tornadoes. You should leave a mobile home and go to the designated storm shelter or the lowest floor of a sturdy nearby building.
  • When vacationing, always bring along a NOAA Weather Radio All Hazards and have a place of safety in mind in the event severe weather threatens.

Emergency Weather Radios

Question:Why do I need an Emergency Weather Radio

Answer: They are like “smoke alarms” for danger

  1. Emergency Radios pick up emergency information 24 hours.
  2. Critical to have on all the time, especially at night.
  3. You get the message directly from the National Weather Service and other agencies immediately.
  4. Alerts you to weather dangers like tornados and floods, accidents like nuclear power emergencies, and terrorist attacks.

Question: How to I get an Emergency Weather Radio?                                                                        

Answer: You can buy them at most electronic stores including:

  • Best Buy
  • Mills Fleet Farm
  • Walgreens
  • Walmart
  • Radio Shack
  • Sears

You can also buy them on line at:

www.weatherradios.com

Question: How much do they cost?                  

Answer: Radios range from $20 to $100.

Question: Are all Emergency Weather Radios the same?                                                                        

Answer: No, you should look for a radio that has S.A.M.E. S.A.M.E allows you to pre-program the weather radio to filter out distant weather warnings. You can program it to monitor different counties in your area.